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Resources

Choosing a gift for an older adult can be difficult, especially for persons with dementia or other disabilities. Families often ask us what would be appropriate gifts to give our clients for the holidays and special occasions. Based on our experience, here are some of our gift ideas.

 

All Trust Gift Certificate

Give the gift of caring. Purchase an instant gift certificate for All Trust Home Care. Certificates can be printed or emailed and can be redeemed by an existing All Trust client or family for services provided.

 

Suggested Readings

 

Image of Forget Memory book cover

Forget Memory by Anne Davis Basting

Memory loss can be one of the most terrifying aspects of a diagnosis of dementia. Yet the fear and dread of losing our memory make the experience of the disease worse than it needs to be, according to cultural critic and playwright Anne Davis Basting. She says, Forget memory. Basting emphasizes the importance of activities that focus on the present to improve the lives of persons with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

Based on ten years of practice and research in the field, Basting’s study includes specific examples of innovative programs that stimulate growth, humor, and emotional connection; translates into accessible language a wide range of provocative academic works on memory; and addresses how advances in medical research and clinical practice are already pushing radical changes in care for persons with dementia.

Bold, optimistic, and innovative, Basting’s cultural critique of dementia care offers a vision for how we can change the way we think about and care for people with memory loss.

 

 

 Book cover Learning to speak Alzheimers
Learning to Speak Alzheimer’s by Joanne Koenig Coste

More than four million Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s, and as many as twenty million have close relatives or friends with the disease. Revolutionizing the way we perceive and live with Alzheimer’s, Joanne Koenig Coste offers a practical approach to the emotional well-being of both patients and caregivers that emphasizes relating to patients in their own reality. Her accessible and comprehensive method, which she calls habilitation, works to enhance communication between carepartners and patients and has proven successful with thousands of people living with dementia. Learning to Speak Alzheimer’s also offers hundreds of practical tips, including how to · cope with the diagnosis and adjust to the disease’s progression · help the patient talk about the illness · face the issue of driving · make meals and bath times as pleasant as possible · adjust room design for the patient’s comfort · deal with wandering, paranoia, and aggression

 

 

 

Book cover of Dementia Beyond DrugsDementia Beyond Drugs: Changing the Culture of Care by Allen Power

If you could provide a life more affirming and meaningful than current care practices provide, would you do it? Of course, you would! But how? Now the resource you need to make this possible is within our grasp.

Dementia Beyond Drugs will enable you to change the way you provide care. Learn what it takes to effect real culture change within residential care settings while reducing the administration of psychotropic drugs in the symptomatic treatment of dementia. This timely new resource, by a board-certified internist, geriatrician, nursing home practitioner, and Eden Alternative ™ Educator, has what you need. Dr. G. Allen Power brings robust medical experience and a unique perspective to the idea of culture change.

 

 

 

Book Cover the Myth of Alzheimers

 

The Myth of Alzheimer’s by Peter J. Whitehouse

Dr. Peter Whitehouse will transform the way we think about Alzheimer’s disease.  In this provocative and ground-breaking book he challenges the conventional wisdom about memory loss and cognitive impairment; questions the current treatment for Alzheimer’s disease; and provides a new approach to understanding and rethinking everything we thought we knew about brain aging.

 

 

 

 

 

Book Cover of I'm still here

I’m Still Here by John Zeisel, Ph.D.

A revolutionary new approach to Alzheimer’s care, focusing on a patient’s strengths to maintain connections with others and the world 

There currently is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease— though it can be treated. For the last fifteen years, John Zeisel, Ph.D. has spearheaded a movement to treat Alzheimer’s non-pharmacologically by focusing on the mind’s strengths.

I’m Still Here is a guidebook to Dr. Zeisel’s treatment ideas, showing the possibility and benefits of connecting with an Alzheimer’s patient through their abilities that don’t diminish with time, such as understanding music, art, facial expressions, and touch. By harnessing these capacities, and by using other strategies, it’s possible to offer the person a quality life with connection to others and to the world.

 

 

 
ADDITIONAL REFERENCE

Video Resources

Terra Nova Films (the first five listed videos are through Terra Nova) http://terranova.org/home0.aspx

I Remember Better When I Paint

More Than Words:  Successful Ways to Care and Communicate with Persons who have Dementia

My Mother, My Father

Alzheimer’s Disease: Inside Looking Out

Journey by Heart:  Caring for Loved Ones with Dementia

There Is A Bridge www.memorybridge.com

& Thou Shalt Honor http://www.pbs.org/thoushalthonor/

The Memory Loss Tapes http://www.hbo.com/alzheimers/memory-loss-tapes.html

 

 

Website References

Alzheimer’s Reading Room www.alzheimersreadingroom.com

Institute for Music and Neurologic Function www.imnf.org

Music and Memory www.musicandmemory.org

Time Slips www.timeslips.org

Dance Therapy with People with Dementia www.octaband.com/dementia_therapy.htm

Memory Bridge www.memorybridge.com

Artists for Alzheimers (ARTZ) www.thehearth.org/aboutartz.html

Memories in the Marking www.alz.org/oc/in_my_community_10849.asp

The Myth of Alzheimers www.themythofalzheimers.comsu

"George has been my right arm. He is very supportive, and my husband likes him very much. When I get a little teary, he always gives me a boost and tells me not worry. What more can I say? He’s very special. "
~ Lana